Skip to content

Birth control and blood clots

birth control pillsAs an organization that teaches natural family planning, we always try to inform women — Catholic and non-Catholic alike — of the truly harmful and risky effects that birth control has on the body.

One such risk is blood clots. Women are often ill-informed on the potential danger of deadly circumstances such as stroke, heart attack or even death that can come with taking the pill. While, of course, it is wise to familiarize yourself with the symptoms of possible blood clots, it also calls into question why such a universally accepted method of contraception is not accompanied by a more thorough explanation of the potential serious risks.

Over the years there have been lawsuits and billion dollar settlements linked to certain contraceptive products, and the risk continues to pop up in the news every once and awhile when a blood clot caused by a contraceptive results in the death of someone (like this story from just two weeks ago). And despite these deaths and lawsuits doctors continually prescribe birth control to women without a lot of warning, which is why women should start taking matters into our their hands and be the best advocates for their own health that they can be.

A writer from a radical feminist magazine, Elizabeth Kissling, commented, “Today . . . young women are again dying from something purported to help them, something that affects mostly women. Thousands more are experiencing life-threatening, health-destroying side-effects, such as blindness, depression and pulmonary embolism.” This goes to show that even those fighting for feminism recognize and are speaking out about the reality that birth control can be harmful to women, rather than only seeing it as a women’s health right.

If you are currently on hormonal birth control, please consider the risk of blood clots in addition to several other harmful side effects. There is a 100% natural and healthy option to postpone pregnancy — natural family planning. Learn more about it, and CCL here!

— Megan Imwalle
Communications Intern